Last edited by Zolozilkree
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

5 edition of Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics found in the catalog.

Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics

With Case Studies on Plantations (Cabi Publishing)

by Alfred E. Hartemink

  • 166 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by CABI .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Applied ecology,
  • Soil science, sedimentology,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Case studies,
  • Science,
  • Technology & Industrial Arts,
  • Tropics,
  • Soil degradation,
  • Agriculture - Agronomy,
  • Agriculture - Crop Science,
  • Life Sciences - Ecology,
  • Science / Ecology,
  • Agriculture,
  • Soil fertility

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages384
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9587563M
    ISBN 100851996701
    ISBN 109780851996707

    SOIL FERTILITY DECLINE IN THE TROPICS WITH CASE STUDIES ON PLANTATIONS and in this book, soil fertility decline is defined as the decline in chemical soil fertility, or a decrease in the levels of soil organic C, pH, CEC and plant nutrients. Soil fertility decline thus includes nutrient depletion or nutrient decline (larger removal than. Professor of Soil Science, Former Graduate Research Assistant, and Assistant Professor of Soil Science, respectively, North Carolina State Univ. Dr. Villachica is now Professor of Tropical Soils, Universidad Nacional Agraria, La Molina, Lima, Peru. Search for more papers by this author.

    The term soil fertility has ancient origins and has been consistently used over centuries to refer to the capability of soil to support plant production in agricultural contexts. Historically, the most common use of soil fertility has focused on provisioning mineral nutrients for plant growth (e.g. Foth and Ellis, ; Tisdale et al., ).An emphasis on fertilizer-based nutrient amendment. This book is published jointly by the International Potash Institute (IPI) and the International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA). It discusses the possibilities and constraints to food production on the many different soil types found in tropical and subtropical countries. By indicating ways in which crop nutrition and hence crop production can be increased on these soils in developing.

    Plantation agriculture is more than years old and contributes to the regional and national economies in many tropical countries. This paper reviews some of the main environmental issues related to plantation agriculture with perennial crops, including soil erosion, soil fertility decline, pollution, carbon sequestration and biodiversity. Soil erosion and soil fertility decline are of. Soil fertility refers to the ability of soil to sustain agricultural plant growth, i.e. to provide plant habitat and result in sustained and consistent yields of high quality. A fertile soil has the following properties: The ability to supply essential plant nutrients and water in adequate amounts and proportions for plant growth and reproduction; and; The absence of toxic substances which may.


Share this book
You might also like
European ophthalmology equipment and markets.

European ophthalmology equipment and markets.

Memoirs of a fellwanderer

Memoirs of a fellwanderer

Chances are few

Chances are few

ARTintegration

ARTintegration

School self-evaluation and the management of change.

School self-evaluation and the management of change.

The Triumph of goodnature

The Triumph of goodnature

Buckingham County, Virginia

Buckingham County, Virginia

Omani proverbs

Omani proverbs

guide to educational measurements

guide to educational measurements

Greek Cooking

Greek Cooking

Verners Pride.

Verners Pride.

Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics by Alfred E. Hartemink Download PDF EPUB FB2

Description. Wide coverage of soils and perennial cropping systems in the tropicsSynthesis of decades of researchChallenges assumptions on the benefits of plantations for soil fertilityIt is generally assumed that soil fertility decline is widespread in the tropics and that this is largely associated with annual cropping and subsistence farming.

In contrast, perennial plant cover (as in plantation agriculture) provides better protection for the book. The book is organized into three sections: the first (Chapters 1–4) gives an overview of human population and soil degradation, plantation agriculture, and soil fertility decline; the second (Chapters 5–10) discusses soil fertility trends in annual crops and various plantation systems, with detailed case studies of sugarcane in Papua New Guinea and sisal (Agave sisalana) in Tanzania; the final section (Chapters.

Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics: With Case Studies on Plantations. Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics.: Wide coverage of soils and perennial cropping systems in the tropicsSynthesis of.

This book, containing 12 chapters including an introduction which focuses on soil fertility under different land use systems in the tropics.

Chapter 2 contains a global literature review on human population growth, soil resources of the tropics, tropical land use and management, soil degradation and sustainable land management. Soil fertility decline in the tropics: with case studies on plantations / Alfred E. Hartemink. Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN (alk. paper) 1. Soil fertility--Tropics. Soil degradation--Tropics. Agriculture--Tropics--Case studies.

Title. ST76H37 22 dc21 ISBN 0 1. the soil chemical fertility is a key prerequisite to sustain crop productivity in the tropics. Several studies perceive that soil fertility decline is widely spread in tropical regions and that it is caused by inadequate nutrient replenishment and high losses as compared to natural.

In the tropics, soil fertility is generally low (Hartemink, ; Zingore et al., ) and in tropical Africa, soil fertility issues have become of mounting interest due to the growing need to.

Hunger is prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, areas that are severely affected by soil degradation and loss of soil fertility, and the link between them is degradation and loss of fertility leads to poor crop yields which, in turn, contribute greatly to food insecurity with subsistence farming that is widespread in the tropics and subtropics.

Despite the economic importance of tree crops in tropical agriculture and commentaries on their ability to maintain and regenerate soil fertility (Sanchez et al., ; Schroth et al., a), much less information is available on the biological mechanisms of soil fertility for multistrata systems than for annual crop-based systems, with most research being focused on mineral availability and balances.

Book Description. As soil and crop management procedures have become more complex, County Agricultural Agents, farm advisors, consultants, and fertilizer and chemical dealers have had to specialize in some aspect of soil fertility and crop nutrition management procedures, limiting their ability to provide a range of advice and services.

Description This book, containing 12 chapters including an introduction which focuses on soil fertility under different land use systems in the tropics. Chapter 2 contains a global literature.

It might be useful to professionals in crop and soil science, or ag teachers, that want to bone up on plant nutrition and soil fertility. It provides information on the role each nutrient plays in the plant, deficiency symptoms, factors that will affect availability and uptake, and fertilizer sources of the s: 8.

It is generally assumed that soil fertility decline is widespread in the tropics and that this is largely associated with annual cropping and subsistence farming. In contrast, perennial plant cover (as in plantation agriculture) provides better protection for the soil. This book reviews these concepts, focusing on soil chemical changes under different land-use systems in the tropics, including.

Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics: With Case Studies on Plantations (Hardback) Alfred E. Hartemink (author). Hartemink, A. (), Soil Fertility Decline in the Tropics – With Case Studies on Plantations, ISRIC-CABI Publishing, Wallingford.

Google Scholar | Crossref Hartemink, A. (), ‘Nutrient stocks, nutrient cycling and soil changes in cocoa ecosystems – a. The tropical environment; Factors affecting soil formation; Processes of soil formation; Classification of tropical soils; Profile features and fertility characteristics of the great soil groups; Physical properties; Nutrient supply: macro and secondary nutrients; Nutrient supply: micronutrients; Soil organic matter and soil organisms; Soil use in the the tropics; Soils under shiftingm.

Soil fertility decline is perceived to be widespread in the upland soils of the tropics, particularly in sub‐Saharan Africa. Most studies have used nutrient balances to assess the degree and extent of nutrient depletion; these have created awareness but suffer methodological problems as several of the nutrient flows and stocks are not measured.

Soil fertility decline is perceived to be widespread in the upland soils of the tropics, particularly in sub‐Saharan Africa. Most studies have used nutrient balances to assess the degree and extent of nutrient depletion; these have created awareness.

This book reviews these concepts, focusing on soil chemical changes under different land-use systems in the tropics. These include perennial crops, annual crops and forest plantations. Two case studies, on sisal plantations in Tanzania and sugar cane in Papua New Guinea, are presented for detailed analysis.

Soil Fertility and Fertilizer Management in Semiarid Tropical India: Proceedings of a Colloquium, Held at Icrisat Center, Patancheru, India, October (Special publication IFDC) by n/a and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at.

Summary: It is generally assumed that soil fertility decline is widespread in the tropics. In contrast, perennial plant cover provides better protection for the soil. This book reviews these concepts, focusing on soil chemical changes under different land-use systems in the tropics, including perennial crops, annual crops, and forest plantations.Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 80) Abstract.

Soil nutrient depletion is increasingly regarded as a major constraint to sustainable food production in tropical environments. Research on soil fertility decline in tropical environments: integration of spatial scales.

In: Finke P.A., Bouma J.Cambridge Core - Soil Science - Properties and Management of Soils in the Tropics - by Pedro A. Sanchez.